Sewage Ejector Pump

Let’s talk about how a sewage ejector pump works and how to replace one. And I’ll also share my independent reviews of the best sewage ejector pump models on the market.

The Wayne RPP50 on Amazon is my #1 sewage ejector pump recommendation because it has a durable cast iron casing, 1/2 HP motor and will pump up to 5,700 GPH. The Wayne RPP50 is a value added workhorse.

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump.

The job of a sewage ejector pump is to pump out sewage and grey water from your house. Your ejector pump handles waste from basement plumbing fixtures, as well as dirty (grey) water from appliances, sinks and floor drains.

You’ll usually find your sewage ejector pump positioned in a basement corner or next to your clothes washer or utility sink.

I can strongly recommend the Wayne RPP50 cast iron sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

It has a high-quality, durable cast iron casing with a 1/2HP motor with a maximum flow rate of 5,700 gallons per hour. And it easily handles up to 2" solids!

And I really like that the Wayne RPP50 will replace almost any sewage pump without having to make any costly plumbing changes!

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump.

What is a sewage ejector pump?

A lot of homeowners may wonder: what is a sewage ejector pump?

The best sewage ejector pump keeps bad smells, waste solids solids and bacteria-filled water out of your basement & home by grinding it and forcing it through to your outdoor septic system or municipal sewer.

The Zoeller M267 sewage ejector pump on Amazon has a 1/2 HP motor, cast iron assembly, automatic float and can pump up to 6,680 GPH.

Check Amazon's price on the Zoeller M267 sewage pump.

When you flush your toilet, drain your sink or run your dishwasher, etc, the sewage & gray water runs down to your sewage ejector pit, that’s located beneath your basement floor.

what is a sewage ejector pump

And then when the level rises in your pit, the float on your sewage ejector pump rises too & activates the pump. Your pump then grinds the sewage & waste water – then discharges it safely out of your home.


What is a sewage ejector pump? Video

And here's a video I wanted to share if you're still wondering what is a sewage ejector pump and how they work.

And that's the short answer to 'what is a sewage ejector pump?', what are the sewage ejector pump types and how they work.

Sewage Ejector Pump: Wayne Sewage Pump RPP50 Review

If you're searching for the best sewage ejector pump for your money, I've included my independent review of the Wayne Sewage Ejector Pump RPP50 for you:

I recommend the Wayne sewage pump RPP50 because it is an affordable, reliable sump pump especially designed for homeowners. And here's my in-depth Wayne sewage pump RPP50 review:

Wayne Sewage Pump Review:

Wayne sewage pump review

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.

With its epoxy cast iron construction and replaceable piggy back tether float switch, the Wayne Sewage ejector pump is a heavy duty & reliable sewage ejector pump that I recommend. Why?

First, it can be replaced with almost all other sewage ejector pump models without a lot of expensive plumbing changes! Genius. That's why I think the Wayne RPP50 ideal for DIY homeowners to install, by themselves, in their basements.

I love pumps that have a cast iron construction because cast iron is strong & non-corrosive. Cast iron won’t rust and cast iron outlasts cheap steel or plastic construction. And this Wayne sewage pump has a cast iron base construction!

This Wayne sewage pump has ½ HP with a maximum discharge flow rate of 5,700 GPH at 0 feet and 3240 GPH at 10 feet of discharge lift.  Designed for 18-inch diameter or larger sewage basin openings, the Wayne sewage pump has a high capacity 2 inch discharge to handle up to 2" solids.

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

Note: This Wayne sewage pump is manufactured to pump sewage, effluent, wastewater, groundwater, and nonexplosive, noncorrosive liquids only.

The RPP50 Wayne ejector pump weighs 26 pounds and is 7 inches deep x 9.75 inches tall x 9.75 inches wide. The Wayne sewage pump is self-priming and is submersible. The maximum working temperature is 133 degrees F and the minimum working temperature of 33 degrees F.

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.

It is equipped with a piggy back tether float switch for automatic or manual operation. The piggyback plug on this Wayne pump allows the pump motor to plug directly into it.  

The lower ball bearings in its assembly allow for the Wayne sewage  ejector pump to have a quieter operation in your home!


Video Wayne Sewage Pumps Reviews

I wanted to include this short video for you to review in case you wanted to know more about Wayne pumps and how Wayne sewage pumps are manufactured in the USA:

As the video explains, Wayne sewage pumps are tested up to one million cycles and they're proudly made in the US.

This Wayne sewage pump RPP50 is a reliable & easy to install residential pump, making it perfect for the DIY'er homeowner.  Designed with an easy carry ring, this Wayne sewage pump is simple to pick up and lower into your sewage ejector pump pit.

The RPP50 Wayne sewage ejector pump is 1-UL Listed, SSPMA Certified, and has a one year limited manufacturer warranty.

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.


Sewage Ejector Pump Float Switch

sewage ejector pump float switch

The Wayne sewage pump RPP50 is equipped with a replaceable piggyback tether sewage ejector pump float switch for either manual or automatic operation.

For automatic operation, use the piggyback plug on the Wayne sewage pump to plug it directly into the pump motor. This allows for the piggyback tether sewage ejector pump float switch to detect water in the sump and automatically turn on the Wayne sewage pump. As the pump empties the sump pit, the piggyback tether sewage ejector pump float switch drops and the switch turns the pump off.

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.

Ideal for large diameter & deeper sump pits, the piggyback tether sewage ejector pump float switch on the Wayne sewage pump allows the pump to stay off longer between pump cycles.  

As you know, the motor of the pump builds up heat during operation, so allowing for the pump to be off longer between pump cycles allows for the motor to cool. This cooling break helps the sump pump to last longer  - and lowers the usage cost of supplying electricity to the Wayne pump.

The Wayne Ejector Pump also has a manual operation that allows the homeowner to turn the pump on and off as needed. The ability to turn to manual operation for the sewage pump float switch is really good to have if you’re testing a sewage ejector pump. And this best sewage ejector pump float switch does have this manual operation option.


Important Manuals and Instructions for the Wayne Sewage Pump

If you're thinking about installing this Wayne sewage pump in your home basement, you can do even more research by viewing or downloading these manuals:

Owners Manual - Wayne Sewage Pump RPP50

Sewage Ejector Pump Sizing Guide - from SSPMA

Or you can visit the Wayne Sewage Pump website.

And if you're interested in learning more about the required plumbing codes for sewage drain systems, you can read here.


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Which is the best Wayne sewage pump? Wayne RPP50 vs Wayne SEL50?

Wayne sewage pump

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne SEL50 sewage pump.

When comparing the best sewage ejector pumps, it’s important to find a pump that will be reliable, durable, and cost effective for you -  and within your budget too! In addition, if you are installing the pump yourself, you must find a sewage ejector pump that is easy enough to install without having to call an expensive plumber.

The Wayne sewage pump RPP50 is a reliable, heavy duty pump that is often compared to the Wayne SEL50. Although both are manufactured by Wayne, the two sewage ejector pumps have different specifications and capabilities.

The Wayne SEL50 sewage pump on Amazon has 1/2HP motor, piggy-back tether float switch and pumps to a max of 7800 GPH.

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne SEL50 sewage pump.

The Wayne sewage pump model SEL50 is made of thermoplastic vs. the durable, heavy duty cast iron of the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump. The Wayne RPP50 cast iron body is physically stronger, more effective, and reliable than plastic models. And cast iron resists rust too!

The Wayne sewage pump RPP50 is smaller than the Wayne SEL50. The Wayne RPP50 is 7 inches deep, 9.75 inches tall, and 9.75 inches wide. The Wayne SEL50 is 8.5 inches deep, 12 inches tall, and 8.5 inches wide. 

The Wayne sewage pump RPP50 has ½ HP with a maximum discharge flow rate of 5700 GPH at 0 feet and 3240 GPH at 10 feet of discharge lift.  The Wayne SEL50 has ½ HP with a maximum discharge flow rate of 7800 GPH at 0 feet and 6420 GPH at 10 feet of discharge lift.

Both the Wayne sewage ejector pump and the Wayne SEL50 have tether float switches.

Here is a table comparing key pump specifications:

wayne sewage pump

Important Manuals for the Wayne Sewage Pump SEL50

And if you want to so even more research on this Wayne sewage pump, I've included these manuals and parts spec sheets that you can view or download:

Owners Manual - Wayne sewage pump SEL50

Parts Spec Sheet - Wayne sewage pump SEL50

Or you can visit the Wayne pump website to read more.


Is the Wayne RPP50 the best sewage ejector pump for you?

Is the Wayne RPP50 the best sewage ejector pump for you?

To sum up this detailed sewage ejector pump review, the advantages of the Wayne Sewage Ejector Pump are its durability, low cost of ownership and ease of installation.  With its heavy-duty cast iron construction and reliability, the Wayne ejector pump is a lower cost option for the homeowner who wants to install the pump -- without a costly professional plumber.

Many homeowners find that the Wayne sewage pump is easy to install without additional help from a professional plumber. Since homeowners can install the Wayne Sewage Ejector Pump without a pro, they can spend hundreds of dollars less than if they would have purchased a different sump pump.

The heavy duty, cast iron construction of the Wayne sewage ejector pump is also an advantage for homeowners due to the long-term value of having a well built, solid pump instead of a pump with a plastic housing installed inside their sewage ejector pit.

The Wayne sewage ejector pump is a common ½ HP size pump, which makes it easy to easy to replace the current model of pump that homeowners have in their homes. And many homeowners like its quieter operation.

So, in my humble opinion its an excellent choice if you're looking for the best sewage ejector pump.

Sewage Ejector Pump System

sewage ejector pump system

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.

A sewage ejector pump system is what you need to properly install a bathroom in your basement. You won’t be able to flush your toilet or drain your sink/shower – or pass your building permit inspection – without a sewage ejector pump system.

Why? Well, if you take a look around your basement, most likely, your plumbing pipes are above your head. Yes, plumbing pipes are generally run along the basement ceiling. 

So, if you install a bathroom in your basement, the waste water will need to flow UP to meet the overhead plumbing pipes that will eventually flow out to your septic system. Or municipal sewer hookup.  

And that’s when your sewage ejector pump system comes in: your ejector pump will force this grey water or waste water UP to your plumbing pipes. And out of your home.

A sewage ejector pump system is often called an “up-flush” system.

sewage ejector pump

Do upstairs bathrooms need a sewage ejector pump system?

Why don’t the other bathrooms in your home need a sewage ejector pump system? Good question! If you have bathrooms on upper floors, you don’t need a sewage ejector pump because your plumbing pipes use gravity to move the waste out of your home.  With the help of gravity, bathrooms on upper floors drain down plumbing pipes & out of your home.

Gravity works for your upstairs bathrooms. And a sewage ejector pump system works for bathrooms at grade - or below grade.

So, when you’re looking at installing a bathroom in your basement, don’t forget that you’ll need to add a sewage ejector pump system to your budget.

Sewage Ejector Pump Problems

sewage ejector pump problems

And you can check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage pump.

I gotta tell you, sewage ejector pump problems are not the most enjoyable things to fix.  After all, you’re dealing with grey water, sewage waste water and some really funky smells from your sewage ejector pump system.

If you're going to fix sewage ejector pump problems you may want to wear a mask. Or at least make sure there's good ventilation in your basement before your tackle sewage ejector pump problems!

So, I wanted to share the following good troubleshooting tips to help you fix the most common sewage ejector pump problems, (also called basement grinder pumps), quickly.  And get your best sewage ejector pump running smoothly again.


Sewage Ejector Pump Problems Video

Sometimes, when you're working on sewage ejector pump problems, a video can really help:

I hope this short video gave you some good tips for fixing sewage ejector pump problems.


Sewage pump not working?

sewage pump not working

One of the most common reasons to see a sewage pump not working is if the float switch is damaged, bent or stuck. You’ll have to pull your sewage ejector pump out of your ejector pump pit and take a look. Is the arm of the float switch bent? Straighten it out & put it back into the pit to see it to see if that’s the reason for your sewage pump not working.

A bent, stuck or damaged float arm or float switch is one of the most common sewage ejector pump problems fixed by homeowners.

If your sewage ejector pump float switch arm isn’t bent, check to make sure there isn’t anything stuck to it that would keep if from rising and engaging.  I don’t want to be too specific, but there are some nasty things that go into your sewer ejector pit and can block or clog up the operation of the float switch, causing sewage ejector pump problems.

Clean off your float, rod and all around your sewage ejector pump. Then put it back in the pit, fill it with water, and see if your sewage pump kicks on.

These are very common reasons why my readers will report "sewage pump not working" and how to fix these sewage ejector pump problems.

Check Amazon's price on the Zoeller Ejector Pump M267.

If your sewage pump float rises, but still doesn’t turn on, you can consider two more troubleshooting options to fix your sewage ejector pump problems: your pump isn’t getting electrical power or your pump float switch is broken.

You need to check whether the outlet, that your sewage ejector pump is plugged into, is really working. My troubleshooting tip is always to advise my readers to plug in another electrical device to test the outlet. If you outlet isn’t working, then that’s the reason your sewage ejector pump is not working. And that's not one of the sewage ejector pump problems - but an electrical problem.

But you’ll need to call in a licensed electrician to handle fixing your outlet.

But if you’re getting juice from your electrical outlet, and still having sewage ejector pump problems, then you may want to consider that your sewage ejector pump switch is broken. You’ll want to consider replacing your basement sewage ejector pump or buying a piggyback type switch to override your broken switch.


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Sewage Ejector Pump Troubleshooting Tips:

sewage ejector pump troubleshooting

Let me share a few more sewage ejector pump troubleshooting tips:

Waste water not moving out of your pit but your sewage pump is working? Another common reason for this type sewage ejector pump problem is a worn out or blocked check valve.  Your check valve has a flapper that keeps your waste water from running back into your ejector pit , via the discharge line, when your sewage ejector pump isn’t running.

Over time, that flapper can become stuck with waste “debris” or tear away from the check valve altogether.  Water can be blocked and won’t be allowed to pass by the check valve – or water will run back into the pit. Either way, your ejector pit water level will not go down.

Replacing your check valve is a common sewage ejector pump troubleshooting tip that works.

And fortunately, installing a new ejector pump check valves is an economical & easy sewage ejector pump troubleshooting fix.  

And if you're wondering what types of terrible problems can be caused by putting a sump pump in your sewer ejector pump pit, read here.

Sewage Ejector Pump Maintenance Tips

sewage ejector pump maintenance

A lot of my readers ask what type of sewage ejector pump maintenance they should do. Fortunately, modern sewage ejector pumps are designed for a longer working life and maintenance free pumping.  

As long as you make sure that potentially damaging items like baby wipes, condoms, dental floss, diapers, sanitary napkins, etc aren’t flushed down your toilet, you really shouldn’t have to worry too much about sewage ejector pump maintenance.  

The most common type of sewage ejector pump maintenance that homeowners are faced with are clearing blockages caused from these types of damaging items. If you avoid flushing these items, you’ll have little to no routine sewage ejector pump maintenance to worry about.

And it's always a good idea to consult your owners manual for other sewage ejector pump maintenance advice that specific for your make & model.

Sewage Ejector Pump Sizing

And a lot of my readers ask about sewage ejector pump sizing. Everyone wants to choose the right size sewage ejector pump so that you have enough horsepower to do the job – and you don’t buy extra power that you just don’t need. You want to buy the best sewage ejector pump that is perfectly sized for your home.

sewage ejector pump sizing

When you’re considering sewage ejector pump sizing, my best advice is to take a look at your existing sewage ejector pump. On every unit you’ll find a name plate or identification plate on the ejector pump housing. Take a look at the horsepower (HP) rating on your old sewage ejector pump.

Then, double check the size of your discharge pipe. Yes, when you’re searching for the best sewage ejector pump, you need to consider the diameter of your discharge pipe too. Most likely, you have a 2” diameter discharge pipe. But it’s good to double check.

Then, for correct sewage ejector pump sizing, you’ll want to choose a brand new model with the same horsepower as the pump you’re replacing. If your old pump was doing a good job – stick with the same HP.

Matching your current sewage ejector pump sizing to your replacement sewage ejector pump is the easiest way to correctly size your new ejector pump.


Sewage Ejector Pump Sizing Video

Here's a short video that you might like to watch to see more sewage ejector pump sizing tips - with some good information about installation too.


But, if your old pump ran a bit too long, or too often, you can step up to the next higher horsepower rating when you’re doing your sewage ejector pump sizing. In that case, if you had a 1/3 horsepower pump, you’ll want to step up to a ½ horsepower model. Only move up, slightly, in horsepower if you want to more powerful pump that will kick on less often.

Sewage Ejector Pump Sizing for New Homes

When you want to choose the best sewage ejector pump size for a new installation or new home, you should keep the following average guidelines in mind:

On average, if you have 1 to 3 drains, a ½ HP sewage ejection pump will be a good choice for you. And if you have 4+ drains, I recommend bumping up to a ¾ HP pump model.

Either way, always double-check the performance chart that comes with each new pump to make sure your sewage ejector pump sizing is on point.

Best Sewage Ejector Pump

I hope my sewage ejector pump reviews have helped you compare and choose the best sewage ejector pump for your basement & budget.

At first, it may seem like choosing the best sewage ejector pump is confusing. But with a little bit of research, and comparison shopping, its something any homeowner can do!

And if you'd like more information about how the best ejector pumps are different than sump pumps, read here.