Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump – What’s the Difference?

Let’s discuss the important differences between an ejector pump vs sump pump. And I'll review the best ejector pumps & sump pumps on the market so you'll make the right choice.

You can check out my #1 ejector pump recommendation: the Wayne RPP50 on Amazon.

The Wayne RPP50 is a durable ejector pump with cast iron base, 1/2 HP motor that provides up to 5,700 gallons max per hour flow rate! And it will replace almost any ejector pump without plumbing changes.

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50.

If you’re a homeowner and you’re inspecting the basement floor, you may think you have what looks like two submersible sump pumps.

But what you really have is a sewage ejector pump and a sump pump! They’re actually two different pumps.

And you can check out my #1 sump pump recommendation: the Zoeller M53 Mighty Mate on Amazon. It has a 1/3 HP motor, makes little to no noise & has a cast iron casing. And with a max of 2,580 GPH it's a workhorse.

Check Amazon's price on the Zoeller M53 Mighty Mate.

An ejector pump does look just like a sump pump. But instead of pumping out ground water that’s collected in the basement, it pumps out the grey (dirty) water from your washing machine, floor drains or utility sink (slop sink). Or it can pump out the sewage waste from plumbing fixtures in your basement because the sewage can’t flow out using gravity.

Basically, an ejector pump handles sewage and gray water. That’s why they’re often called a sewage ejector pump or sewage pump. Ejector pumps are usually positioned in the floor near your washer/dryer.

I can strongly recommend the Wayne RPP50 cast iron sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

It has a high-quality, durable cast iron casing with a 1/2HP motor with a maximum flow rate of 5,700 gallons per hour. And it easily handles up to 2" solids!

And I really like that the Wayne RPP50 will replace almost any sewage pump without having to make any costly plumbing changes!

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump.

Ejector Pump Review: Zoeller Ejector Pump M267

Let's take an in-depth look at the Zoeller ejector pump model M267:

This ejector pump by Zoeller features a solid cast iron base (ASTM Class 25) with cast iron switch case & pump housing, which is non-corrosive. This ejector pump is built to last!

And you can check Amazon's price on the Zoeller M267 sewage ejector pump.

It also has stainless steel screws, bolt, handle and guard/arm assembly, which I love, because these parts are usually the first to break due to rust on cheap steel. But the stainless steel parts on this Zoeller ejector pump won't rust!

This Zoeller ejector pump M267 features 1/2 horsepower motor, 115V with a 2" NPT discharge line connection. With an automatic float switch.

And this Zoeller ejector pump monster will chew up and spit out up to 2" solids. Wow.

Check Amazon's price on the Zoeller Ejector Pump M267.

And if you'd like to learn even more about the specs on this Zoeller ejector pump, I've included some important manuals and spec sheets:

Manuals & Spec Sheets for the Zoeller Ejector Sewage Pump:

Owners Manual - Zoeller Ejector Pump

Spec Sheet - Zoeller Sewage Ejector Pump

Technical Data Sheet from Zoeller

Earlier in this review, I talked about how this Zoeller ejector pump could chew up solids - up to 2" solids! And this video shows you just how easily this Zoeller ejector pump grinds up waste solids in sewage:

Video - Zoeller Ejector Pump Destroys Sewage Solids

Here's a video that shows you the grinding action of this ejector pump:

That's amazing grinding action, isn't it?

And if you still need more information on this Zoeller ejector pump, you can always read more at the Zoeller website.


Ejector Pump Replacement

If you’re like me, you like to do DIY projects to save money. And ejector pump replacement is a project any handy homeowner can do.

On average, if you hire a pro for ejector pump replacement, you can except to pay anywhere from $500 - $800+. But you can do your own ejector pump installation, on average, from about $200 - $325.

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

And I wanted to share my step-by-step tips for doing your own ejector pump replacement:

Ejector Pump Replacement Tips:

  • Always shut off your water at the main valve before you do anything else!
  • You’ll see two pipes entering your ejector pump pit. One pipe is your ejector pump air vent and the other pipe is your discharge pipe.
  • If there’s no clamp or flange already installed on these pipes to disconnect them, you’ll have to saw through the pipes instead. And you’ll need to use a spacer, flange or gasket to reconnect the pipes at the very end of your ejector pump installation
  • At this point in your ejector pump replacement, I recommend that you put on a mask. The smell coming from an ejector pump pit can be disgusting.
  • Take off the bolts from your ejector pump cap/cover. You may have to loosen the pipe gaskets.
  • Have a garbage pail or bag ready! When you pull your ejector pump up, out of the pit, nasty/smelly stuff will be dripping off of it!
  • Pull the ejector pump out of the pit
  • Loosely put your ejector pit cap, over the pit opening, while you’re waiting to install the new pump into the pit
  • Unscrew your old ejector pump off the discharge line and screw on your new ejector pump
  • Lower the new pump into your ejector pump pit
  • My tip: always make sure that the float of your new ejector pump replacement is on the opposite side of the pit where the inlet is located! The incoming rush of sewage from your inlet can harm or break your float – so position it on the opposite side of the pit.

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

  • My tip: if you have a check valve on your discharge line make sure there’s an open 3/16” weep hole to prevent air lock!
  • Slide your cover over the pipes and thread the ejector pump electrical cord through it
  • Reconnect the air vent and discharge pipes
  • Secure the ejector pump cover bolts and you may want to run a bead of silicone around the edge of the cover, pipes and electrical cord to make them airtight.

Whew! These are the basic steps to do your own ejector pump replacement but you should always read your owners manual, first, for more ejector pump installation tips. And your new ejector pump owners manual will also give you maintenance and testing advice.  

Video - Ejector Pump Replacement

And if you'd like to see an ejector pump replacement video, I think the video below is a good one to watch:

Hopefully this ejector pump replacement video gave you a few more good tips to make your ejector pump installation go smoothly.


Basement Bathroom Ejector Pump

basement bathroom ejector pump

Thinking about putting in a basement bathroom? Yes, adding a basement bathroom really adds a lot of value to your home. And what family doesn’t need more bathrooms?

But if you’re thinking about putting in a new basement bathroom, you’ll definitely need to know about installing a basement bathroom ejector pump too.

Why do you need a basement bathroom ejector pump?

When you put a new bathroom in your basement, you have to remember that your sewer lines generally run in your basement ceiling – usually along the ceiling joists. When you stand in your basement – your waste water pipes are generally located above your head. Or at your shoulder or waist level.

Your existing sewer pipes run above the area where your new basement bathroom is going. So, the gravity force that keeps water flowing down from your other bathroom & kitchen appliances to your waste pipes won’t help you in your basement. As you know, water doesn’t run uphill.

You’ll need an ejector pump to force the waste water up, from your basement shower, sink or toilet, up to your sewer lines. And out of your home.

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.


Video - Do I need a basement bathroom ejector pump system?

If you'd like to learn more about who actually needs a basement bathroom ejector pump system, this short video will talk about the reasons why you need an ejector pump:

I hope you found the video helpful and that it answered your questions about why homeowners need an ejector pump.


What are the alternatives to a basement ejector pump?

Some of my readers have asked about any alternatives to a basement ejector pump. Well, instead of installing a basement ejector pump, you could consider a composting toilet instead.

You can check out the Natures Head composting toilet on Amazon. It's self-contained, easy to install, lightweight and made in the USA.

Check Amazon's price on the Natures Head composting toilet.


And if you'd like to do more research about having a composting toilet in your basement, instead of installing an ejector pump, you can view or download the following manuals and warranty information:

Installation Manual  Natures Head Composting Toilet

Warranty

Brochure

Or you can visit their website.


Video Installing a Natures Head Composting Toilet

If you're wondering how to install a composting toilet instead of an ejector pump in your basement bathroom, this short video shows you how:


Personally, I don’t think composting toilets are the best option. Why?

Well, it’s true that you don’t need water for a composting toilet, but you will need to install a vent to the outside. So, you won’t have water available for a sink or shower if you go with a composting toilet. But if you install an ejector pump, you can provide water to a sink or shower too!

And composting toilets must be cleaned & emptied on a regular basis. Ugh. And quite frankly, a good composting toilet can cost up to $900-$1,000 or more. That’s not exactly cheap.

In my humble opinion, installing a basement ejector pump and proper water lines is a much better option than installing a composting toilet for your basement. I think you get more value & convenience, with an ejector pump, over the long run, for your investment.


Basement Bathroom Ejector Pump System Options

Ok, you’re ready to install a basement bathroom ejector pump. So you have two options for installing an ejector pump system:

1.  Above ground sewage ejector pump system (also called a freestanding ejector pump system)

2.  Below ground ejector pump system

Let’s talk about these two types of ejector pump systems with their pros & cons:

Above Ground Ejector Pump System

You can choose an above ground ejector pump system to install and you’ll avoid having to dig through your concrete basement floor. These above ground ejector pumps systems are enclosed mini septic tanks with a pump, that sit on your floor. And above ground ejector pumps are also called up-flush toilets.

Basically, the waste water from your toilet, sink, bath, shower, washer, etc., will drain into this mini septic tank – and its internal pump will pump it up to your sewage drainage line that flows out of your home.

Below Ground Basement Bathroom Ejector Pump

Or you can go with a traditional below ground basement bathroom ejector pump. And most contractors will tell you that, generally speaking, a below ground basement bathroom ejector pump system is the least expensive way to go.

One of the reasons that a basement bathroom ejector pump system is a more economical option is because its components are now commonly sold as a complete package to homeowners. Back in the day, you’d have to buy all the components & parts separately – and a basement bathroom ejector pump cost more back then.

Yes, you will have to create a hole in your basement floor to create your ejector pit. And you may have to lay some down some new drainage pipe. And over the years, there will be some maintenance to do, too, to avoid a sewer backup issue.

So you’ll want to add up these below ground ejector pump installation costs when you’re deciding which basement bathroom ejector pump system to install.


Video How to Install an Ejector Pit

Here's a video I wanted to share that shows you how to install an ejector pit for your basement bathroom ejector pump:

As you can see, you'll need to break through your concrete to dig out your ejector pit. Or you can hire a contractor to do it for you.


Popular Articles and Videos on this Page:

Basement Bathroom Ejector Pump 101

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Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump Video

And if you're like to see a short video that talks about the differences between an ejector pump vs sump pump, here it is:

Now that you know how to tell an ejector pump vs sump pump, read on for more information about finding the best sump pump.


A sump pump, on the other hand, can be a pedestal or submersible style device – although submersible models are newer and much more popular with homeowners. You’ll find a sump pump positioned in your sump pit, in a basin, where water from the ground that surrounds your home, is collected.

And when the water level gets high in the pit, the float switch is activated and your sump pump starts running. It pumps this ground water out of the basement, to your lawn or storm sewer, to keep your basement from getting damp.

I highly recommend the Zoeller M53 Mighty-mate Submersible Sump Pump with 1/3HP, on Amazon, as the best submersible sump pump value for homeowners.  

Here’s why: the 1/3HP motor size is the right power size for the average sized home & it makes little to no noise when it’s running. And this Zoeller M53 sump pump has a high quality cast iron switch case, motor and pump housing. 

The Zoeller M53 will pump a maximum of 2,580 gallons per hour. It’s a workhorse!

Check Amazon’s price on the Zoeller M53 Mighty-mate.

Documents for the Zoeller M53 Might Mate:

You can view or download the Zoeller M53 installation manual or parts list. Or learn more about the Zoeller M53 technical specs by visiting their site.

How Can I Tell the Difference Between the Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump in my Floor?

This picture helps you learn the difference between an ejector pump vs sump pump.

And you can see my best sump pump recommendation for homeowners: the Zoeller M53 Mighty-mate Submersible Sump Pump on Amazon.

Lots of homeowners ask: 'whats the difference between an ejector pump vs sump pump?'

An easy way to tell the difference between the two pumps, in many homes, is too look at the type of lid on the pit or basin. An ejector pump will always have a sealed lid! The sealed lid will keep dangerous sewer methane gas and other smells from wafting through your home. Nasty stuff. But a sump pump system may have an open or loose-fitting cover.

This is an ejector pump sealed lidThis is the sealed lid on an ejector pump

Another way to tell the difference between an ejector pump vs sump pump is to check the diameter of the discharge pipes. Ejector systems use a 2” discharge pipe, but a sump system almost always uses a 1 ½” discharge pipe size.

And if these two tips don’t help you – here’s a no fail way to tell the difference between ejector pump vs sump pump: run the water in your basement utility sink, or, if you have a basement toilet, flush it! Doing one of these things will start your ejector pump, also know as a grinder pump, and you’ll be able to identify it.


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Ejector Pump Replacement
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Visual Differences of an Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump

Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump: which is best?

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Zoeller Ejector Pump Review

Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump Video


Which Pump is More Important to Have?

Really, a sewage ejector pump and a sump pump are both important devices for keeping your home dry and safe.

But if your sump pump breaks, your entire basement can flood! And you could rack up thousands of dollars of damage to your walls, furniture, flooring, etc. That’s why sump systems usually have battery back-up systems that will kick in when the primary pump fails. Trust me, a battery backup for your sump pump is worth it. You never want to come home to a flooded basement.

And you can see my top recommended 1/2 horse power submersible sump pump: the Wayne CDU800 sump pump on Amazon.

If an ejector system fails, you will get some spot flooding, but not the great amount of water that a sump failure brings on. The worst thing about an ejector pump flood is that you’ll have to deal with dirty and stinky sewage or grey water. Ugh. You have to handle the cleanup carefully and make sure the area is disinfected.

What is an ejector pump?

what is an ejector pump

Let's talk about what is an ejector pump and when you'll need one in your home.

An ejector pump is installed in an ejector pit, below your basement floor, and it will pump up waste water & grey water from your basement toilet, sink, shower or appliance -  to your main sewer line.

An ejector pump, which is also called a sewage ejector pump, is what you need if you have laundry appliances, a sink, shower, toilet and other appliances in your basement.

If you have any of these appliances or plumbing features in your basement, an ejector pump will the pump solids & liquids, from them, into your septic/sewer line.

When you're thinking about what is an ejector pump vs sump pump, just keep in mind that a sump pump is for pumping out excess rain water or snow melt, from your sump pit. But an ejector pump pumps out gray water from bathrooms, sinks, shower and appliances.

Solid advice to help you keep in mind the differences between an ejector pump vs sump pump.


Ejector Pit Basics

Let's take a moment talk about what is an ejector pit and how an ejector pit fits into an ejector pump system.

An ejector pit is just one part of an ejector pump system that’s needed if you have a laundry room, utility sink or bathroom installed in your basement or below your main septic line.

To install a brand new ejector pit, you’ll need to break through the concrete of your basement floor and dig. Most ejector pits are dug to about 3 feet deep & 2 feet wide.  Many homeowners hire a contractor to dig a new ejector pit because its hard work.

An ejector pit is lined with an ejector basin, which is usually made of durable polyethylene material with a fiberglass or steel cover. It looks like a big bucket. Most ejector basins hold about 30 gals of sewage/waste, on average.

Ejector pit covers have pre-cut slots, in the top, for your discharge line and air vent.

Inside the basin is where the ejector pump is placed. When the waste water level in the basin reaches a certain height, the ejector float rises and trips the ejector pump. Then ejector pump starts to pump waste out of the ejector pit. And once the level of waste water goes down again, the ejector pump turns off.

Finally, it’s very important for every ejector pit to have a tight & sealed cover on! Really, the smells & gases from an ejector pit are not only nasty, but dangerous. You need to have a sealed, tight cover on your ejector pit to keep odors and gases from invading your home.

That’s a basic description of an ejector pit and its function.


Ejector Pit Video

This ejector pit video shows you how the ejector pit fits into the entire sewage ejector pump system:

I hope this short video gave you a clear idea of how an entire ejector pump system is set up.


Ejector Pump vs Sump Pump Installation

There are some questions I get a lot, from homeowners, when someone asks me about an ejector pump vs sump pump: What about installation? Can I install and ejector pump and sump pump by myself? Are they good DIY projects?

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

If you want to install an ejector pump in your basement, because you’re putting in a washing machine, sink or toilet, etc., I recommend hiring a professional plumber - not taking it on as a DIY project. Why? Well, if you’re never had an ejector sump pump in your basement before, because there were no appliances, you’re most likely going to have to break up concrete in your basement floor, lay drain pipes, etc. That’s a pretty big job. For the average homeowner, renting a demolition hammer, breaking concrete, laying pipe, putting in backfill, etc., for an ejector pump, is just too complicated or time consuming.

I should mention that most basement flooring concrete is about 4” thick. That’s a lot of concrete to bust & move to install an ejector sump pump.

Video - How to Install an Ejector Pump

I wanted to share this short but helpful video to give you some tips if you want to install your ejector pump yourself:

And I hate to say it, but you really should get a plumbing permit from your township, for this ejector pump construction and installation. You’ll have to create a drawing of all the plumbing lines & fixtures you want to install, before they’ll issue you a permit.

But, if you’re strong and have some mechanical or construction experience, installing an ejector pump in your basement might be the right DIY project for you.

I can strongly recommend the Wayne RPP50 cast iron sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

It has a high-quality, durable cast iron casing with a 1/2HP motor with a maximum flow rate of 5,700 gallons per hour. And it easily handles up to 2" solids!

And I really like that the Wayne RPP50 will replace almost any sewage pump without having to make any costly plumbing changes!

Check Amazon's price on the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump.

When you consider ejector pump vs sump pump installation, I do feel that the easiest sump pump installation is putting in a pedestal sump pump.

And you can see my top pedestal sump pump recommendation: the Flotec 1/3HP pedestal pump on Amazon.

A pedestal sump pump sits right on top of your basement floor, so installation time is minimal! No pits to dig or concrete to bust.


Ejector Pump Cost

If you're budget minded like me you want to find out everything about the ejector pump cost, before you begin.

If you're like me, you watch your budget, so you're probably wondering about ejector pump cost. So let's talk about the 2 situations in your home when you should be aware of the ejector pump cost:

Ejector Pump Cost to REPLACE an Existing Unit:

If you already have an ejector pump in your basement that you need to replace, then you can expect to pay anywhere from $275  - $750+ for a replacement ejector pump.

Ejector pumps on the lower end of this range will usually feature 1/3 to 1/2 HP (horsepower) motors which is a popular size.  Ejector pump costs on the higher end of this range generally feature more HP or commercial grade components.

The ejector pump cost for replacing an existing ejector pump is fairly low, especially if you're a handy homeowner & you can do the install yourself.

In my area, southeastern Pennsylvania, local plumbers charge about $55 to $95 per hour. So, you'll save money on the ejector pump cost if you're able to replace it yourself.

Ejector Pump Cost for a New Installation

If you don't have an ejector pump in your basement, but you're putting in a basement bathroom or laundry room, you'll need to install a new ejector pump pit & ejector pump. And the ejector pump cost for installing a brand new system is higher than replacing a worn out pump.

First, you'll need to select & buy your ejector pump or grinder pump. Then you'll need to attach your new ejector pump to your discharge & plumbing line, etc. Then you'll need to be aware of local plumbing codes, etc. The list goes on.

For me, installing an entirely new ejector pump system is better off in the hands of a pro. But take my advice, get a written quote from any plumber, before you have them start the job. Then you won't be faced with ejector pump cost sticker shock.


Why do I need a basement bathroom ejector pump?

Let's talk about why you need a basement bathroom ejector pump if you have a sink or bathroom fixtures in your basement.

A lot of my readers wonder why they need a basement bathroom ejector pump when they don’t need one for the bathrooms located on other floors of their home.  That’s a good question! Let’s talk about why you actually do need a basement bathroom ejector pump for your downstairs basement.

In your home, your plumbing system relies on the constant push of gravity to make grey water & waste move down the pipes & flow of your home. Your home plumbing pipes were chosen with appropriate diameters, and installed at precise slopes and angles, in order to take advantage of gravity.

Unless there is a clog or crack in your plumbing pipes, you can be sure that gravity will take care of making sure your pipes are flowing to eliminate waste water out of your home.

But gravity cannot help basement bathroom water/waste flow out of your home. You need a basement ejector pump.

And I highly recommend the Wayne RPP50 sewage ejector pump on Amazon.

You see, plumbing pipes usually run between floor joists and they are located at your basement ceiling level. So, your basement plumbing pipes actually run above your head. And they're called overhead sewer lines.

And since your bathroom fixtures (sink, toilet, shower, etc) are located below the level of these plumbing pipes -  gravity won’t help - and that’s why you need a basement ejector pump to force basement water/waste out.

A basement ejector pump will force this basement water & waste to your home septic tank or a municipal sewer system pipes.

Yes, you do need the push from a basement bathroom ejector pump if you have a sink, shower or toilet installed in your basement.


Ejector Sump Pump Vent

You must have an outdoor ejector pump vent in order to keep your house safe.

And don’t forget that you’ll need a plumbing vent if you install a sewage ejector sump pump. Most townships require a 2” plumbing vent pipe for sewage ejector sump pumps. Many plumbers run a new ejector sump pump vent through the inside of an existing wall, continue through the attic, and up through the roof.

But, if an ejector sump pump vent can’t be run through an existing wall, you can always run it through the rear corner of a closet. Then you can just box it in with drywall.

Either way, a sewage ejector sump pump must be vented.


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Zoeller Sewage Ejector Pump

Have you wondered if you should install a Zoeller sewage pump in your home? A lot of homeowners wonder if they really need a sewage ejector pump in their basement – and if a Zoeller sewage pump is their best bet. If you’d like to learn more, read my Zoeller sewage pump page.


And if you'd like to read some in-depth reviews of the most popular Wayne sump pumps, you can visit my Wayne sump pumps page.


If you have an ejector pump or sump pump, you'll want to install a sump pump alarm too.

You can add a sump pump alarm when you're considering an ejector pump vs sump pump.

Once you've decided on an ejector pump vs sump pump, you'll also want to think about adding a sump pump alarm.

A sump pump alarm is a small, relatively inexpensive device that can detect water. It's very sensitive, so if water begins to puddle on your floor, it's loud alarm will let you know!

When you hear the sump pump water alarm, you'll want to jump into action to correct the problem. And help yourself avoid a full flood.

You can install sump pump alarms in your sump pit, right at your water threshold. Or you can place it on the floor, on a wash tub or wall. Any place that you'd like to be able to detect accumulating water.

Glentronics Basement Watchdog Water Sensor and Alarm

You can check out my top sump pump alarm recommendation: The Glentronics Basement Watchdog Water Sensor and Alarm on Amazon. It's a great early warning system that only needs a 9 volt battery.

It detects unwanted water at only 1/32" deep, before damage starts,  and it has a loud 110Db alarm.

And you can check Amazon's price on the Glentronics Basement Watchdog Water Sensor and Alarm.

If you'd like more detailed information, you can view the manufacturers specs for the Glentronics water sensor and alarm here.

Sump pump water alarms are battery powered, so you can rest assured knowing that your alarm will work even if you have a black out.  And many sump pump water alarm systems have a low battery noise to let you know when you need to change the battery.

And I am a big fan of the sump pump alarms that have built-in WIFI. Why? I love that the new wireless sump pump alarm models will instantly email or text you too. So, if you're on vacation - or out of the house - you'll still know if a wet basement problem is developing in your home. Genius.

And you can check out my #1 wireless sump pump alarm that will send you email & text notifications: the D-Link WiFi Water Alarm on Amazon.

So, when you're considering an ejector pump vs sump pump, also consider putting in a sump pump alarm.

Ejector Sump Pump Troubleshooting Tips

Believe me, while we're talking about ejector pump vs sump pump issues, I want to warn you that there's nothing nastier than when your ejector pump fails. Trust me, routine maintenance and knowing the most common troubleshooting tips can help you avoid cleaning up a smelly, disgusting mess.

The most common problem homeowners will see with an ejector pump is that it's not turning on or cycling. Don't panic. Just follow these simple diagnostic steps:

  • Make sure the electrical outlet is actually getting power. Test the electrical outlet it by plugging in something else in the outlet. And if the outlet isn't getting any electrical juice, you'll want to check your fuse box. You may have tripped your fuse. If your fused isn't tripped, and you're not getting power to the outlet, now is the time to call your electrician.
  • A lot of times, the problem is with the float switch. Check out your float switch: is it stuck or twisted? Sometimes its just a matter of straitening it out, if it's twisted or bent. Move the float up and down to see if it engages the ejector pump switch.
  • If moving your float up and down doesn't engage your ejector pump, you can buy a piggyback switch which will bypass your existing switch. Buying a piggyback switch is an inexpensive option to help keep you from buying a brand new ejector pump.

As you can see, it's important to know the differences between an ejector pump vs sump pump.

And if you've already experienced a flood in your basement and you're wondering what you should keep - or throw away - you can pick up some important tips from this FEMA article.

Would you like see my recommendations for the best sump pumps for homeowners

You can read my tips on choosing the top sump pump for you.

Need sump pump repair? You’ll want to check out my top sump pump repair and troubleshooting tips.

If you’d like to see a handy chart of my top rated sump pumps and sump pump battery back up recommendations, click here.

Wondering what’s a sump pump and what it will do for you?

Now you know all the important differences between an ejector pump vs sump pump.